The Evolution of the 21st-Century Scientist

I was recently invited to be a guest blogger over at Macroscope, the official blog for American Scientist Magazine. Below is an excerpt from my post about the evolving role of scientists in the 21st Century. You can read the full post by clicking here. Read more “The Evolution of the 21st-Century Scientist”

Can too much science be a bad thing? Growth in scientific publishing as a barrier to science communication.

There’s no doubt we live in an exciting time of innovation and discovery. With thousands of academic journals currently in print, more scientific research is published today than ever before. And the amount of scientific research being produced only continues to grow each year.

According to a search on PubMed – the free online database developed and maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) – scientific research has increased exponentially over the last century. The amount of research published in 2014 (514,395) was more than triple the amount published in 1990 (136,545), more than 100 times the amount published in 1950 (4,432), and more than 3,000 times the amount published in 1940 (153). Read more “Can too much science be a bad thing? Growth in scientific publishing as a barrier to science communication.”

How Many Citations Does a Typical Research Paper in Psychology Receive?

grad student aspirations

Image Credit: PhDcomics.com

At one point or another, every aspiring scientist dreams of someday revolutionizing their field. After all, who wouldn’t love to publish a body of work that goes on to be remembered for heralding some exciting new discovery or for challenging longstanding paradigms or schools of thought?

But how realistic are such aspirations, particularly in psychology? If you’re a psychological scientist publishing research in peer-reviewed journals, what are the chances that others will read and cite your work? And how many citations does a typical research paper in psychology receive?

Read more “How Many Citations Does a Typical Research Paper in Psychology Receive?”